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quotevadis:

"Resentment is like drinking poison and waiting for the other person to die."

Carrie Fisher, an American actress, novelist, screenwriter, and performance artist. She is best known for her portrayal of Princess Leia Organa in the original Star Wars trilogy. She is also known for her bestselling novel Postcards from the Edge and screenplay for a film of the same name, as well as her autobiographical one-woman play and the non-fiction book Wishful Drinking she based it on.

alsoknownasaki asked:

As soon as you get this; write five things you like about yourself on your blog and then send this to your top ten favorite followers: Please do this, I chose you personally, not at random!

1: I like that I can be very imaginative & creative

2: I like how adaptable I can be

3: I like that I am willing to stand up to people, no matter their size or station

4: I like how passionate I can be about social issues

5: I like that I can do my own computer work (repair/upgrade/building,etc)

unconsumption:


Rupert Blanchard is sitting on what was once a pile of junk. The plywood top of this cabinet used to be a hoarding on a building-site, one of the drawers comes from a Victorian shop-counter, another is from a 1970s G Plan sideboard, and under his leg is part of a fire-safety sign of the kind he saw in the park as a child. In his hands all of them have found a renewed purpose. The furniture he makes is greater than the sum of its parts.
Blanchard is 34 and originally from Wiltshire. In 1999, a graphic-design course at Central St Martin’s brought him to London, where the streets were paved “not with gold, but with rubbish”. He started collecting the city’s leftovers, reimagining and refashioning them into furniture so distinctive that his style was quickly imitated; his designs remain highly sought after. Now his days are spent scouring demolition sites, house clearances, scrapyards and the like to find objects he can put to new use.
He has rules. “A material cannot be usable in its present state, it must be undervalued and no longer fit for its original purpose.” And, ultimately, it must be destined for landfill. Breaking up an object for its parts is not acceptable.

 (via IN LOVE WITH LEFTOVERS | More Intelligent Life)
Zoom Info
Camera
Canon EOS 5D Mark III
ISO
400
Aperture
f/2.8
Exposure
1/125th
Focal Length
74mm

unconsumption:

Rupert Blanchard is sitting on what was once a pile of junk. The plywood top of this cabinet used to be a hoarding on a building-site, one of the drawers comes from a Victorian shop-counter, another is from a 1970s G Plan sideboard, and under his leg is part of a fire-safety sign of the kind he saw in the park as a child. In his hands all of them have found a renewed purpose. The furniture he makes is greater than the sum of its parts.

Blanchard is 34 and originally from Wiltshire. In 1999, a graphic-design course at Central St Martin’s brought him to London, where the streets were paved “not with gold, but with rubbish”. He started collecting the city’s leftovers, reimagining and refashioning them into furniture so distinctive that his style was quickly imitated; his designs remain highly sought after. Now his days are spent scouring demolition sites, house clearances, scrapyards and the like to find objects he can put to new use.

He has rules. “A material cannot be usable in its present state, it must be undervalued and no longer fit for its original purpose.” And, ultimately, it must be destined for landfill. Breaking up an object for its parts is not acceptable.

 (via IN LOVE WITH LEFTOVERS | More Intelligent Life)

…Things have been pretty touchy and perpetually on the edge of a complete mental and physical collapse since June… But it is starting to look like things might actually work out right now… I’ve been through alot since then,most of which I’m not comfortable going into, but its intense by many standards. Maybe I’ll put my story on tumblr when things feel more secure. But for now I feel like;

image

pic found here

adventuretime:

If you’re going to read just one wonderful Adventure Time write-up today (and you should), make it this one by Maria Bustillos. In it, she talks with the key creative gang of Pen, Adam, Pat, Kent, Rebecca, Nick, and Jack, making for a fairly definitive overview of the series. Read it here. Thanks, Maria!

The resolution of each eleven-minute episode is anything but tidily triumphant; each one is as likely to end on a question or a joke as on an answer. Yet one comes away satisfied, a little bit the way one might at a David Lynch movie. The narrative is endlessly malleable, and includes all the possibilities granted by the existence of wizards and magical creatures, time travel, and a huge, ever-evolving cast. It’s a canvas and a story big enough for dozens of artists to make their own way. Even the drawing style is inconsistent, handmade-feeling; longtime fans may learn to detect the hand or voice of a favorite storyboard artist or writer. The goal of the show seems to be exploration, not uniformity.

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